A SMALL COLLECTION OF ANTIQUE SILVER
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THE WHAT IS? SILVER DICTIONARY

PAX

The 'PAX' ('pax' is a Latin word. In English it means 'peace') is an Eucharistic tablet decorated on the front with a Sacred Scene that was kissed by the priest celebrating the Mass, then offered to the kiss of other officiates and, finally, to the faithful.
It was called 'osculum pacis' or 'tabella pacis' and was used since the 13th century replacing the ancient 'kiss of the peace' which preceded the Holy Communion.
The ancient use of the 'PAX' is certified by the mention of the 'osculatorium' on Archbishop of York Walter de Gray's Statutes (1250).


Our Lady and Dead Christ



The 'PAX' was usually rectangular (but there are some round examples) with a small base and a handle for its standing (it was used also as a small portable altar).
The ' PAX ' was made of many different materials (gold, silver, bronze, ivory, glass) and different and often conjoined techniques (embossing, bas-relief, niello, engraving, enameling). (Dizionario di Antiquariato - A. Vallardi-Garzanti, Milano 1992)

on the left 'Our Lady and Dead Christ' (Venice 18th century)



The Virgin Mary with Children Our Lady and Dead Christ
The Virgin Mary with Children
(Venice 18th century)
Our Lady and Dead Christ
(Venice 18th century)

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