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THE WHAT IS? SILVER DICTIONARY

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TOOTHPICK HOLDER (FIGURAL)

Anthropologists believe that early men picked their teeth with sticks cut to a sharp point.
Evidence of Stone Age toothpicks is indirect but compelling and the demonstration is on fossil teeth. Analysis of their marks has led to the consensus that they were made by heavy toothpick use by our early ancestors.
The grooves were especially common in the teeth of Neanderthals who lived in Europe and Asia, about 100,000 years ago. Similar markings have been found in the fossilized teeth of both American Indians and Australian Aborigines.
At this age people did not know how to repair teeth and only good care was the method to maintain their teeth, so they tried clean their teeth instinctively and a branch of wood was the beginning of toothpick.
Toothpicks were introduced into Japan about 528 along with Buddhism via China and Korea. In India twigs from Neem tree were used but as they did not grow in China use was made of the willow tree, a spicebush, a cedar, a peach tree, or a bamboo.
The clean custom of the toothpick migrated from the usual life of Buddhist monks very shortly to the nobles. Soon officers of the Court and Shinto priests began to imitate their clean custom.


silver toothpick holder: James Aldridge, London 1808

Romans and Greeks were also avid oral hygiene enthusiasts.
The early Romans had their own dental-care preferences. Pliny the Younger of Rome (61-113 A.D.) proclaimed that using a vulture quill as a toothpick would cause halitosis, but using a porcupine quill was acceptable because it 'made the teeth firm'.
In fifteenth-century Europe, picking the teeth was widely accepted until philosophers began to issue conduct warnings. Rhodes said: 'Pick not thy teeth with thy knyfe, but take a stick, or some clean thyng, then doe you not offend'.
Personal silver, gold or ivory toothpicks were widely used in the Middle Age and often were included in travelling sets together with knife and spoon.
At the beginning of 19th century, with the introduction of disposable wooden toothpicks, the use of figural holders suitable to display the toothpicks on the table, spread in Continental Europe. Usually these holders had a pierced base or a small container where sunburst toothpicks ornamentations were inserted.

silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder

silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder


silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder

silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder silver figural toothpick holder

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