THE DIRECTORY OF AUSTRALIA SILVERSMITHS
MARKS AND HALLMARKS OF AUSTRALIAN SILVER

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AUSTRALIA SILVERSMITHS - ALPHABETICAL LISTING
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AUSTRALIAN SILVERSMITHS    A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Y    Z    NOT IDENTIFIED
ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF MARKS
(click on the photo to enlarge image)
EAVES John H.
New South Wales, Sydney
active 1880s/1890s
EDWARDS William
EDWARDS EDWARDS EDWARDS EDWARDS
Victoria, Melbourne
active 1850s/1860s
John EMMERTON & Son
Victoria, Geelong
active 1880s/1920s



FAIRFAX & ROBERTS
FAIRFAX & ROBERTS FAIRFAX & ROBERTS FAIRFAX & ROBERTS FAIRFAX & ROBERTS
New South Wales, Sydney
active since 1920s. W.J. Sanders acted as supplier of the Fairfax & Roberts retail jewellery business.
FIDLER & KENDRICK
South Australia, Adelaide
active 1920s
FIRNHABER Charles Edward
FIRNHABER Charles Edward FIRNHABER Charles Edward FIRNHABER Charles Edward
South Australia, Adelaide
active 1850s/1870s



FISCHER Edward Francis Gunter
FISCHER Edward Francis Gunter
Victoria, Geelong
active 1850s/1910s
FLAVELLE & BRUSH
New South Wales, Sydney
active 1840s
FLAVELLE & ROBERTS
New South Wales, Sydney
active 1880s/1890s
FLAVELLE BROS
New South Wales, Sydney
active 1850s
FLAVELLE BROS & CO
New South Wales, Sydney
active 1850s/1860s
FLAVELLE BROS & ROBERTS
New South Wales, Sydney
active 1860s/1880s
FLAVELLE BROS. LTD.
New South Wales, Sydney
active 1900ss
GOLDING William
GOLDING & SON
W. Golding - Hobart W. Golding - Hobart
Tasmania, Hobart
Golding had apprenticed under David Barclay, a convict turned successful silversmith. In 1875 he was working independently founding his own business at 52 Murray Street. Following on Barclay's retirement in 1878, Golding purchased his long established business. He then advertised in 'The Mercury' of 18 March 1878: "... (W.G.) desires respectfully to inform the customers of Mr Barclay that in addition to his own long experience as a practical watchmaker he has engaged several first class workmen and is prepared to execute any orders in watchmaking and repairs, as well as in the manufacture of jewellery of every description ...." William Golding (late Barclay), watchmaker and jeweller, was listed at 96 Liverpool Street, with branches at Murray Street, Hobart, and Brisbane Street, Launceston.
At the Tasmanian Exhibition, held in Launceston, 1891, Golding's display included: "... every description of gold and silver jewellery, own manufacture, precious stones, etc.". Early in the 1890s William Golding moved to the firm's present site at the corner of Liverpool and Elizabeth Streets, Hobart. The firm became Golding & Son in 1903, and with the retirement of the founder in 1912, the business was continued by his sons, Arthur and William. The present proprietor is Arthur Bruce Golding, great grandson of William Henry Golding.


HALLMARKS OF ENGLISH SILVER - MAKER'S MARK IDENTIFICATION
ALPHABETICAL LISTING
OF SILVERSMITHS' NAMES
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
THE DIRECTORY OF CAPE SILVERSMITHS A - C D - I J - M N - T U - Z
THE DIRECTORY OF CHANNEL ISLANDS SILVERSMITHS A - F G - H I - P Q - Z unidentified makers
CANADIAN SILVERSMITHS A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
BRITISH TOWN MARKS AND DATE LETTERS
AUSTRALIA AND ITS SILVER - A BRIEF HISTORY
 1841 map of Australia Colony
Australia in the 19th century was made up of six separate colonies, New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania, Queensland and Western Australia, South Australia (including, at this time, also the Northern Territories).
In term of working silversmiths only three colonies supported any number of craftsmen, namely South Wales capital, Sydney, Victoria, capital Melbourne and South Australia capital, Adelaide.
In the first half of the 19th century inhabitants of Australia were few tenths of thousands and pre 1850 Australian silver by comparison to colonial silver in general must be considered very rare.
Most working silversmiths with retail business carried imported silver or plated items as current stock and locally produced items were manufactured only to fulfill immediate orders (as presentation trophies) when the waiting time to order pieces from England was too long.
No form of official mark or date letter system was introduced into the hallmarking of Australian silver.
Early Australian silversmiths marked their objects with their full name or initials and imitations of English hallmarks as leopard's heads, lions and anchors.
In 1988 was formed the Gold and Silversmiths Guild of Australia. A voluntary system of marking was introduced (maker's mark, standard mark, guild mark and date letter).

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